Books Bans, School Boards, and Burnout: An Interview with Shivi Mehta

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“…I think a lot of new organizers especially believe that if they stop or take a break, this movement will die. That mentality is incredibly common. I faced it, a lot of my friends faced it, and it takes time to think about, ‘No, I should probably take a break because I’m burnt out. I can’t contribute anything to this movement if I am burnt out,’ and it takes time to realize that.”

Summary of “this season: banned books”

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“According to the ALA, the overwhelming majority of banned materials in 2021 were books (82%), but media like film and exhibits were also included. Additionally, parents are the number one initiator of challenges, followed by patrons and boards/administrations. Only 1% of challenges were initiated by students. A newer study from PEN America found that 474 books were banned in classrooms across 15 districts from July1, 2021 to March 31, 2022.”

Finding a Way to Serve: Our Board President’s 9/11 Story

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“Across the 80th floor (as we found out later) was a huge, dark slash where the left wing of the airplane cut through. Then in the middle was a gaping, smoking hole, a rough circumference of the aircraft fuselage. Following on the right was another dark slash where the other wing had carved through the building. We were stunned. People tried to call family and friends to make sure they were safe. But it wouldn’t be long before cell service dropped dramatically.”

The Dangers of Crossing the U.S./Mexico Border

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“It’s hard for people to sympathize when we don’t always know the full story. These people have sacrificed so much to get here and yet we still don’t value them. This country is known to be ‘The Land of the Free.’ These people deserve to know what it’s like to experience a little bit of autonomy, they deserve it. After all, studies have shown they help our economy because they increase the size of the labor force.”

A Snapshot of Algorithmic Activism: Spotlighting Encode Justice

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“The overturning of Roe v. Wade has raised some concerns about the use of facial recognition outside of reproductive health clinics. This era of surveillance and criminalization infringes on citizens’ constitutional rights, shifting the position of cisgender women and individuals with a uterus from victim to criminal. Americans have to actively take precautions to protect their inalienable rights from those they were taught to trust.”

An Unbroken Tempo: The Modern-Day Abolitionists Fighting to End the Exception (Part 2)

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“We understand that there will then be the need to follow up on that to make the legal and legislative changes and practical changes that really mean there is not slavery and involuntary servitude in actual practice. There’s a lot of other work that needs to happen in the criminal justice system, but you would think that we could at least agree that whatever it is, it shouldn’t be slavery or involuntary servitude.”

A Statement from March On Foundation on the overturning of Roe v. Wade

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“We also want to reaffirm our commitment to our current staff, board members, and future members of the MOF family: we respect your bodily autonomy. You have the right to have easy and safe access to abortion without having to divulge personal details. Whatever we can legally do to help you get this essential healthcare if you need it, we have your back.”

An Unbroken Tempo: The Modern-Day Abolitionists Fighting to End the Exception (Part 1)

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“But at the core of it is this thing that has gone unbroken since our country’s founding. It’s like a steady drum beat that hasn’t ever broken its tempo. Slavery was never abolished, it was simply reformed, especially through convict leasing, especially through the expansion of share cropping, all the way into our modern era- war on drugs, mass incarceration.”

A Mother’s Prerogative: An Interview with Reverend Marguerite Morris Interview (Part 2)

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“I have to maintain that there’s hope, because that’s about faith… People so often, when they don’t see it right away, or they try it one time and it doesn’t work [they give up]… But the thing is: longevity and determination will get you further than a quick answer.”

A Snapshot of Youth Climate Activism

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“I think the lack of recognition of BIPOC climate activists is a huge issue. I think a lot of attention has been given to Greta [Thunberg], and more recently Peter Kalmus, and they deserve it, but is a shame that there are so many people of color who have also been doing the work, especially on a community level, that go completely unrecognized… I encourage people to look around and see if there are local organizers, especially Indigenous and Black youth, who are doing things to fight the climate crisis and support them any way they can.”

“Do not draw your attention away from Chernobyl” (Part One)

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*Audio accessible*

“…we seem to be repeating the same pattern that led to the accident in the first place: we are constantly warned by experts that this is a serious issue that requires our careful attention, and almost every time they are dismissed. Just like the Soviet Union, we as a global community are being afforded opportunity after opportunity to take Chernobyl seriously. And, like the Soviet government, we are not seizing those opportunities.”

Acts of Care: A Conversation with Chef Jenny Dorsey (Part Two)

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*Audio accessible*

“Because change happens so slowly over a period of time, I sometimes wonder when we look at the Civil Rights marches and we know that they were hugely impactful right now, 50 years later, but at the time how did everyone in them feel? I wonder if they also felt unsure of the future and if this was going to create real change.”

Acts of Care: A Conversation with Chef Jenny Dorsey (Part One)

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*Audio accessible*

“I think overall food is an act of care. Cooking is an act of care. You know, eating is an act of care in different ways. Food can take on so many different meanings, which is why people care about it so much. It can very much be a really loving act of care, but also it can be a very negative, really painful, really like… it can stir up a lot of things.”

My American-Ecuadorian Identity Crisis

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*Audio accessible*

“I know my cousin didn’t mean to exclude me because in Ecuador being born in the United States is the greatest thing that could occur. Whenever I would go back and forth from Ecuador to the United States I would always hear them say “Mis primos son de los Estados Unidos” with such pride. However, what they don’t understand is the huge identity crisis that so many children of immigrant parents go through.”